Hadleigh & Thundersley WW1 Roll of Honour (Surnames N-Z)

Research by Val Jackson

PAGRAM, 9902 Pte Claude Granville, 3rd Royal Fusiliers,(City of London Regiment).

Born at Finsbury Park, Private Pagram was the son of gardener Albert Edward and Elsie Annie Pagram of Truitt Lodge, Thundersley Common.  He enlisted at Southend during December 1914, being sent to France at the beginning of April 1915.  He had only been in the trenches a few weeks when he was killed in the fierce fighting east of Ypres on 8th May 1915 aged 18.  A comrade wrote:"He was hit by a piece of shrapnel which passed through the heart... He died a hero's death."  His name is commemorated on the Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgium and at St Peter's Church, Thundersley.

PEAKE,SP/2230 Pte William Hadwen, Sportsman's Bn, 24th Royal Fusiliers, (City of London Regt).

Born at Atherton, Lancashire, Private Peake lived in Hart Road Thundersley.  He was the son of nail manufacturer Richard Manley and Emma Dorothy Peake and at age 17 was working as a commercial traveller.  He enlisted at Southend in December 1914 and was killed in action by a shell at Delville Wood during the Somme offensive on 31st July 1916 aged 43.  His officer described him as:"A most valuable man and had been reported by myself for most excellent work done under terrific shell fire that morning".  His name is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and at St Peter's Church, Thundersley.

PETCHEY, 19195 L/Cpl. Sidney George, 9th Essex Regiment.

Lance Corporal Petchey was born in Hadleigh and was the son of George and Emily Petchey of The Street, Hadleigh. He worked as a butcher and boarded with Mrs Matilda Franklin at The Poplars, New Road, Hadleigh. He enlisted at Southend in June 1915. He was killed in action on 2nd April 1916 aged 25, and was buried at Vermelles. He is commemorated on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

PHILLIPS, 68930 Gunner George Francis, 62nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.

Born at Bethnal Green, Gunner Phillips was the son of tobacco dealer Frank and Alice Mary Phillips of "Oaklea", The Chase, Thundersley.  He enlisted in January 1915 and was killed in action at Arras on 17th April 1917 aged 20.  He is buried in Tilloy British Cemetery, Tilloy-Les-Mofflaines, France.  His name is commemorated at St Peter's Church, Thundersley.

PIPER, 251697 Pte. William George, 5th Essex Regiment.

Born at Downham, Private Piper lived in New Road, Hadleigh and was the husband of Annie Eliza and father to George, William Ernest and Annie Rose. He enlisted at Chelmsford in June 1916. He was reported as wounded and missing at the Rafa Redoubt, Palestine on 2nd November 1917, and was subsequently presumed to have been killed on that date, aged 39. He is commemorated on the Jerusalem Memorial in Israel and on the Downham War Memorial. He is commemorated on the Hadleigh War Memorial as George C. Piper.

POND, 14427 L/Cpl Arthur Edward [Edwin] 9th Essex Regiment.

Born at Holloway, Lance Corporal Pond was the son of Alfred and Alice Pond of "Hilltop", 2 Church Road, Thundersley.  In 1911 he was working as a butchers assistant and in September 1914 he enlisted at Southend.  He was sent to the front in August 1915, taking part in the fighting at Hill 60 and Loos.  He had been wounded twice and had only been in France for six weeks when he was killed by a shell at Vermelles on 13th October 1915.  He was 25  years old.  His younger brother Frederick was killed on the 10th November 1917 (see below).  Lance Corporal Pond is commemorated on the Loos Memorial and in St Peter's Church, Thundersley.

POND, A/201961 Rifleman Frederick Charles, 2nd King's Royal Rifle Corps.

Rifleman Pond was born at South Tottenham and educated at Thundersley.  He was the second son of Alfred and Alice Pond of "Hilltop", Church Road, Thundersley.  He was employed on the Red Motor Buses running between Hadleigh and Leigh-on-Sea, and later at Kynoch's Garage in Southend.  He initially enlisted in the A.S.C. at Grove Park in March 1917 (M/299504 ASC TR/59232, 16th Training Bn) and was sent to France in the following June.  He was killed in action on 10th November 1917 at St Julien, north-east of Ypres at age 19 and was buried at Duhallow A.D.S. Cemetery, Belgium.  His brother Arthur was killed on the 13th October 1915.  Rifleman Pond is commemorated at St Peter's Church, Thundersley.

RAISON, 53033 Pte. Arthur Stanley, 32nd Royal Fusiliers.

Private Raison was the son of Mrs Eliza Raison of the Poplars, High Street, Hadleigh. He enlisted in the 17th Lincolnshire Regiment (No.23541) in March 1915. He was killed in action in Ypres on 19th September 1917 aged 31. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium and on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

RAYNER, 19011 Pte. Joseph, 18th Northamptonshire Regiment.

Private Rayner was the son of John and Mary Ann Rayner of 2, May Cottages, High Street, Hadleigh. He enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery (No.98251) at Southend on 6th April 1915. He was later transferred to the Northamptonshire Regiment as a signaller, and had been in France for less than one month when he was killed in action on 19th August 1916 at the battle of Bazentin, part of the Somme offensive aged 23. He was buried at Bazentin-le-Pett cemetery in France. A comrade, Private H. Dilley wrote: ‘It is with deep regret that I have to inform you that your son Joe was killed on August 19th. It is some consolation to know he never suffered and death was instantaneous. He was buried decently, as soon as possible, and you have the sympathy of all his mates, as he was liked by all who knew him. It was about eight o’clock on a Saturday night when it happened.’ His name appears on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

RICHARDS, 169192 Gnr John Henry, Royal Field Artillery.

Born at Adderley in Shropshire, Gunner Richards lived at Thundersley and enlisted at Shrewsbury in August 1916, subsequently being sent to France.  In October 1917 he recieved a very severe wound to his forehead.  His life was despaired of from the beginning and his wife was summoned to France.  He recovered sufficiently to allow his transfer to St George's Hospital and by April 1918 was sufficiently convalescent to be allowed to visit Thundersley for a few hours.  He was taken very ill " on Saturday week" and died on 24th April 1918 aged 22.  He was buried with full military honours in the North-East corner of Thundersley Churchyard by a company of soldiers from Shoeburyness.  His name is also commemorated inside St Peter's Church.

RIVERS, 8896 Sgt. Bert, 2nd Bn. Essex Regiment.

Sergeant Rivers was born in Thundersley the eldest son of Walter and Ellen Rivers of Hart Road, Thundersley.  In 1912 he married Annie Agnes Bell and at the outbreak was living at Hornchurch.  He enlisted at Warley and was sent to France where he was killed in action on 23rd October 1916 at the battle of Le Transloy part of the Somme offensive,he was aged 31.  His name is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, the Brentwood Memorial and in St Peter's Church, Thundersley.  His brother David Rivers was killed on 18th April 1917, and brother Percy Hubert 4th December 1915 (see below).

RIVERS, 15158 L/Cpl. David Henry, 1st Bn. Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry.

Lance Corporal Rivers was born in Thundersley, the youngest son of Walter and Ellen Rivers of Hart Road, Thundersley.  His father died in 1903 and by the age of thirteen David Rivers is to be found at the Stockwell Orphanage for Fatherless Boys and Girls, Clapham Road, Stockwell.  He enlisted at Lambeth and was sent to France where he was killed in action on 18th April 1917 aged 19.  His name is commemorated on the Arras Memorial and in St Peter's Church, Thundersley.  His brother Bert was killed on 23rd October 1916 (see above) and brother Percy Hubert 4th December 1915 (see below).

RIVERS, 36527 Sapper Percy Hubert, 54th Field Coy. Royal Engineers.

Sapper Rivers was born in Thundersley, the son of Walter and Ellen Rivers of Hart Road, Thundersley.  In 1911 he was living with his Seagrave relatives in Camberwell and working as a printing machine minders assistant.  He later went to work for London County Council tramways and was living at Newington Causeway.  He enlisted in London and after only three months in France was wounded on 20th November 1915, later dying 4th December 1915 aged 20.  He is buried at Etaples Military Cemetery, France and his name is commemorated in St Peters Church, Thundersley.  His brother Bert was killed 23rd October 1916 and brother David Henry 18th April 1917 (see above).

ROWBOTTOM, 439021 Pte. Charles Frederick, 31st Bn. Canadian Infantry.

Private Rowbottom was born in Islington, the son of Edward and Queenie Rowbottom and husband of Emma Rowbottom of "Brooklyn", London Road, Hadleigh.  He married Emma in 1909 and in 1910 the couple embarked for Canada on SS "Canada", Emma returning to the UK in 1915 with son Allan and daughter Edna on the "Corinthian". Charles was returned to Canada on the hospital ship "Letitia" for a military discharge,caused by heart disease on 20th April 1917, eventually dying in the UK on 20th July 1919 aged 33.  He is buried in Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey.

RUSSELL, 12/3147 Sgt. Eric, 16th Waikato Co. 2nd Aukland Regiment. New Zealand Expeditionary Force.

Sergeant Russell was the son of James Scott and Violet Foulis Russell of The Chase, Thundersley and described by the CWGC as "a native of Peebles, Scotland."  He was killed in France on 30th September 1918 aged 22, and is buried in the Marcoing British Cemetery, France.

SARGENT, 33980 Pte. Samuel 3/13 (!st Barnsley) Bn. York and Lancaster Regiment

Born at Rawreth, Private Sargent was the eldest son of Mrs Eliza Sargent of 7, The Avenue, Kiln Road, Thundersley and the late Mr Samuel Sargent.  He was educated at Hadleigh Council School and was subsequently employed by Mr Ruggins, poultry farmer of Kiln Road. He enlisted at Warley in March 1917 and was sent to France, being invalided home in the October of the same year with trench feet.  He returned to France on 2nd April 1918 and was killed in action sixteen days later on the 12th April aged 19.  His mother recieved the following letter from the Rev. John Calderbeck C.F.:"No doubt you have already heard the sad news of your son's death, Pte. S. Sargent Y & L., but I wish to join with my brother officers and men in forwarding our deepest sympathy with you in your sad bereavement.  After we came out from the fighting on the Somme we only had a few days rest before we were sent north to take part in the new offensive which had commenced.  We arrived at our destination early one morning, and in the same evening made a successful counter attack, but unfortunately, your son and a number of his comrades lost their lives as we were going over to take the position.  The place where your son fell was in the neighbourhood of a cluster of buildings called -----, which is some little distance east of the village of -----.  We mourn with you in the loss of another brave comrade who has laid down his life for all we hold most dear, but we pray that the sacrifice of all the gallant comrades will not have been in vain.  Our hearts go out to you in your great sorrow, and we pray God's blessing be with you in all your sad bereavment."  His name is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium and on the South Benflet War Memorial.

SAWARD, G/9069 Pte Robert Louis, 6th Royal Kent Regiment (Queens Own)

Private "Bert" Saward was born at Thundersley and was the eldest son of bricklayer Fred and Ada Saward of Church Road, Thundersley, he worked as an assistant to his father.  He enlisted at Southend in July 1915, and had served in France since May 1916, where he had been wounded.  He was killed in action on 15th January 1918 aged 21.  His captain wrote:"It is with the deepest regret that I am writing to tell you the very sad news of the death of your son, Private Saward.  He was killed in action on January 15th about 3am being hit by a bombardment of our trenches, and he died instantly without suffering any pain.  Please accept my deepest sympathy for you in your very sad bereavement and sincerely trust that the news of him being given a military funeral by a chaplain behind our lines will console you a little.  A detachment from the battalion was present.  Your son was a very good soldier and one of my best Lewis gunners and was a very good man on the gun.  We always found him willing."  He is buried at Croix-Du-Bac British Cemetery, Steenwick Belgium and left a widow.  His name is commemorated at St Peter's Church, Thundersley. 

SCOUGALL, 4274 2nd Lieut. Douglas Muir, 1st/15th London Regiment (Rifle Brigade).

2nd Lieutenant Scougall was the eldest son of James and Emily Scougall, who for several years lived at Canvey Marine Parade, Leigh Park Estate, and latterly at Bedford House, Benfleet Road, Hadleigh. He joined the London Scottish in January 1915 and was commissioned in November 1916. 2nd Lieutenant Scougall went to France on 16th February 1917. He was killed in action on 4th May 1917, aged 19, and is buried in the Tank Cemetery at Guemappe. He is commemorated on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

SCUDDER, 26623, Pte William,2nd Grenadier Guards.

Private Scudder was born at Thundersley and was the eldest of four sons of Stephen and Elizabeth Scudder of "Hillside", Daws Heath Road, Thundersley.  In 1911 he was living at Church Road, Thundersley working as a plasterer and enlisted at Southend in October 1916.  He was sent to France, being killed on 27th August 1918 aged 37.  He is buried at Mory Abbey Military Cemetary, Mory, France, and left a wife Florence and four children.  Second Lieutenant R.C.M. Beran wrote:"It is with great regret that I write to tell you of your husband's death.  He was killed on the 27th August, when the Battalion attacked the German positions.  Throughout the battle he has shown the utmost gallantry and contempt for danger and it was while sniping at a hostile machine gun that was delaying the advance, that he met his death.  His loss is deeply felt by all those that knew him, amongst whom he was very popular and a man respected.  Please accept my sincere sympathy in your loss, but I know he met his death in a way which all at home, both relatives and friends, will be truly proud."  He had two brothers serving, one of whom had been discharged.  His name is commemorated at St Peter's Church, Thundersley. 

SEWELL, 41783 Pte. Frederick William, 1st South Staffordshire Regiment.

Private Sewell was born in South Benfleet and was the son of Frederick and Ellen Sewell of 1, St. John’s Road, Hadleigh. He enlisted at Southend in February 1917 and was killed in action in the Battle of Passchendaele on 26th October 1917, aged 19. His name appears on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium and on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

SMITH, 40770 Pte Ernest Albert, South Wales Borderers.

Private Smith was born at Thundersley, the son of baker William and Philadelphia Smith and lived at Prospect House, Daws Heath, Thundersley.  He initially enlisted in the Essex Regiment (No 32781) at Southend before being transferred to the South Wales Borderers.  Whilst serving in France, he was wounded and died on 4th June 1917.  He is buried at Duisans British Cemetery, Etrun, France and is commemorated in St Peter's Church, Thundersley.(as A Smith.)

SMITH, 192680 Acting Quartermaster, Harold George, Royal Naval Reserve.

Harold Smith was the third son of Mr G. A. Smith, and lived at 2, Linda Villas, Leigh Road, Hadleigh. He joined the Navy at 15, serving on H.M.S. Terrible during the Boer War (Medal without bar). He subsequently served in China during the Boxer Rebellion and on the destroyer H.M.S. Speedy and later on H.M.S. Skate and H.M.S. Roebuck. He was called up as a reservist in August 1914, serving on H.M.S. Sutlej and later H.M.S. India. On 8th August 1915, H.M.S. India was torpedoed off Norway, and, though rescued, Harold subsequently died from the effects of exposure. He was 34 years old and left a widow and one daughter. He is commemorated on the Chatham Naval Memorial and on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

SMITH, 49720 Airman (2nd Class) Percy Louis, Royal Flying Corps (111th Squadron).

Percy Smith was the eldest son of Mrs Mary Ann Smith of Plantation Cottage, Daws Heath, Thundersley, and lived with his sister, Mrs Smith of The Library, Hadleigh. Her husband, Private G. W. Smith, had served in Salonika since November 1916. Before his enlistment, Percy was employed as a cycle repairer at Mr Norman’s for seven years. He joined the Essex Regiment in 1914, and served in the Royal Engineers and Bedfordshire Regiment before being posted to the Royal Flying Corps. He was sent to Egypt in early 1915, shortly after spending his 20th birthday at home. He was part of a group of men repairing an aero engine when they were hit by a bomb dropped from an enemy aircraft. Percy died two days later on 3rd December 1917 at Gaza Military Hospital and was buried in the Gaza War Cemetery. He was 22 years old and his name appears on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

SMITHERS, 2445 Pte. Raymond Norwood, 2/17th London Regiment.

Private Smithers was born at Cardiff, the son of evangelical minister Frederic Raynes Smithers (Reverend Fred) and Emma Maria Smithers of "Glaslyn" Thundersley.  In 1911 the family were living at Daws Heath. He was educated at Southend High School.  Raymond enlisted into the Territorial Force at Bow on 2nd September 1914 aged 17 years and 4 months. During training at the White City he was soaked through, and being unable to change his clothes, contracted a cold which turned into rheumatic fever.  His illness left his heart weak and he was discharged from the army as "no longer fit for service" on 17th June 1915.  He later suffered a relapse and died at home on 15th November 1915 aged 18 and is buried in Rayleigh Cemetery. His name is commemorated on the Rayleigh Holy Trinity and Rayleigh Legion memorials.  The Southend Roll of Honour states that he died as a "result of exposure during trench digging on the East Coast".

SNOW, 8638 Pte. Henry, 1st Essex Regiment.

Private Snow was the son of Mrs Elizabeth Snow of New Road, Hadleigh. He was born at Hadleigh and had served seven years in the army, having been stationed in India at the outbreak. On 25th April 1915 he embarked for the Dardenelles and he was killed in action at Gallipoli on 8th May 1915, aged 30. His name appears on the Helles Memorial in Turkey and on the Hadleigh War Memorial. He had two brothers also serving, Driver Frederick Snow R.F.A. and Lance Corporal George Snow, Essex Regiment.

STAINES, 60372 Bombardier Archie, Royal Garrison Artillery.

Archie Staines was the youngest son of Charles and Louisa Staines of the High Street, Hadleigh. He had been born at Hadleigh, where he attended the Church School, and was later employed by Mr W. T. Taylor, timber merchant. He enlisted at Southend in October 1915 and, after sixteen months in France, was killed by a shell on 14th August 1917, aged 20. He was buried at Calonne and then moved to Loos British cemetery. Major C. R. Sturges wrote: ‘I am deeply grieved to have to inform you that your son Bombr. Archie Staines was killed in action this morning. His death was instantaneous, and was the result of shock caused by a shell bursting close by. There was no mark on his body whatever, and he will be buried this evening in the little cemetery near here. Your son was a most promising non-commissioned officer, and was a great favourite with all of us. Please accept the deepest sympathy of myself and the rest of the battery in your great loss.’ Gunner Sid Wheeler wrote the following: ‘It is with the greatest sorrow that I have to write these few lines to let you know the sad news that your son, Archie, was killed in action on the gun. We were firing at the time when a German Shell fell right amongst us, killing Archie and three others. But perhaps it will relieve you to know that he suffered no pain, for when we came to look we could find no wound of any kind on his body. It was the shock of the explosion that killed him, as he died instantly. He was given a decent burial in one of our cemeteries just behind the line this evening. This has been a great upset to me for Archie and I have been together ever since the battery was formed, and he was one of my best chums. He was a great favourite and loved by all the section. We all send our deepest sympathy to you in our great loss.’ His name appears on the Hadleigh War Memorial. His elder brother, Corporal Wilfred Staines, was killed on 22nd June 1917 and his other brother, Private Sydney Staines, died in hospital on 16th April 1916 (see below). Bombadier Archie Staines and Private Wilfred Staines are both mentioned on the grave of their brother Private Sidney Staines in St James Churchyard, Hadleigh.

STAINES, 17385 Pte. Sidney Charles, 5th Coldstream Guards.

Private Staines was the son of Charles and Louisa Staines of the High Street, Hadleigh. He enlisted at Southend in November 1914 and died in hospital at Hammersmith, after four months in training, on 16th April 1916 aged 22. He was buried in Hadleigh churchyard north-west of the church and his name appears on the Hadleigh War Memorial. His older brother Wilfred was killed in action on 22nd June 1917 (see below) and his younger brother Archie was killed on 14th August 1917 (see above).

STAINES, 7678 Cpl. Wilfred James, 9th Royal Fusiliers, (City of London Regiment).

Wilfred Staines was the son of Charles and Louisa Staines of the High Street, Hadleigh. He was born at Hadleigh and went to the Hadleigh Church School. He was afterwards in the building trade, working for several employers. He enlisted at Southend on 5th October 1914 and, following training at Colchester and Codfield St. Mary, was sent to the front on 26th July 1915, going through Loos unscathed. He was home on leave on 23rd March 1916. On 1st July 1916 he was shot through the hand and treated at Mile End Military Hospital, London, and came home for ten days leave. Returning in October 1916, he was wounded in the neck by shrapnel on 25th April 1917, and this time was treated at a C.C.S. where he helped to bring in the wounded, and while doing so brought in an old school chum. He acted as a bomb-thrower and was killed in action at Arras on 23rd June 1917, aged 26. He was buried at Monchy-le-Preu, and later moved to Vis-en-Artois British Cemetery, Haucourt. His name appears on the Hadleigh War Memorial. 2nd Lieutenant C. E. Watson wrote: ‘I deeply regret to inform you that your son was killed in action yesterday evening. I sincerely sympathise with you in your sad loss, especially as he was one of my best and bravest, steadiest and noblest. He feared nothing. Mercifully death was instantaneous, not lingering. I hope you will understand how difficult this is for me to write; but believe me when I say how I sincerely sympathise with you. This morning I had his body taken behind and buried properly.’ His brother Archie was killed on 14th August 1917 and his other brother Sidney died in hospital on 16th April 1916 (see above). Bombadier Archie Staines and Private Wilfred Staines are both mentioned on the grave of their brother Private Sidney Staines in St James Churchyard, Hadleigh.  

STIFF, 16109 Pte. George, 10th Essex Regiment.

Born at Raydon in Suffolk, Private Stiff was the son of Elizabeth and the late Alfred Stiff. He lived at Leigh Park Farm, Leigh-on-Sea, where he worked as a shepherd and stockman. He enlisted at Warley in November 1914 and was sent overseas on 25th July 1915. While acting as servant to Lieutenant Openshaw at Delville Wood, part of the Somme offensive, he was believed to have been making his way to a dressing station when hit by a shell on 20th July 1916. Lieutenant Openshaw was also killed. George was 37 years old and left a widow Mary Louisa, who lived at ‘Holton’, Softwater Lane, Hadleigh. His name appears on the Thiepval Memorial and on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

STOCKWELL, G/9375 Pte. James, 2nd Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment).

Private Stockwell was born at Clapham and lived at Hadleigh. He enlisted at Southend and was sent to the Balkans on 25th August 1915. He was killed in action at Gallipoli on 14th November 1915 and buried at Azmak Cemetery, Sulva, Turkey. He is commemorated on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

STOKES, 9843 Pte, William, 2nd Leicestershire Regiment.

Born on Canvey Island, Private Stokes was the son of Frederick and Ellen Stokes of the High Street, Hadleigh. He enlisted at Leicester in 1913 and was sent to France on 26th January 1915, where he was killed in action on 15th May 1915, aged 19. He is buried in the Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy, France. His name appears on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

SWAN, 10028 Pte Henry George, 2nd Essex Regiment.

Born at Pitsea, Private Swan was the son of farm worker Walter and Ellen Swan and lived at The Common, Thundersley.  He enlisted at Warley eighteen months before the war and was sent to France after the battle of Mons.  He was killed in action on 22nd November 1914 aged 23.  His name is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial Belgium, and in St Peter's Church, Thundersley.

THEOBALD, 144721 Gnr Samuel James, 6th Siege Bn. Royal Garrison Artillery.

Gunner Theobald was born at South Benfleet and was the son of farm bailiff William James and Eliza Theobald. He was the brother-in law of Mr C Butcher, caretaker of Sutton Road Cemetery and was employed for several years as a general labourer by the Southend Waterworks Company.  In 1911 he was living at Hart Road, Thundersley with wife Sarah and children Arthur and Ada.  He enlisted at Southend in March 1917, and had only been in France for three weeks when he was killed on 31st July 1917 aged 38.  He was a battery wireless operator and was killed instantly by a stray shell, leaving a widow and two children.  He is buried at Cite Bonjean Military Cemetery, Armentieres, France.  His name is commemorated on the Butcher family grave in Sutton Road Cemetery, Southend and in St Peter's Church Thundersley.  His widow Sarah was later remarried to Edward Fuller in 1907.

TODD, 33932 L/Cpl Jack, 10th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment.

Lance Corporal Todd was born at Southampton, Hants, the son of C.W. and Jane Todd of "Stirling" Bradley Ave, Thundersley.  He enlisted in the Army Cyclist Corps at Chisledon, Wilts, in February 1915 (No 11512) and was later transferred to the Loyal North Lancashires.  He was reported missing presumed killed at Monchy-le-Preux on 11th April 1917 aged 23.  His name is commemorated on the Arras Memorial and in St Peter's Church, Thundersley.  In January 1919 his brother Charles was convalescing in India following service in Mesopotamia.

TOMS, G/6699 Pte. James Marcel, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment) 3rd Bn.

Private Toms was born at Lambeth, the son of Howard and Sarah Toms of "Homelands" 1, New Road, Hadleigh and the husband of Elizabeth Toms of 14, Darlan Road, Fulham. Before enlistment he was employed as a cook.  He enlisted at Caxton Hall, London on 2nd September 1914 aged 28, initially in the Dragoons (7706). On 2nd June 1915 he was transferred to the 3rd East Kent Regiment and as part of the British Expeditionary Force was sent to France on 15th June 1915.  On 28th September 1915 he was reported as missing  presumed dead.  His name is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, France.  His military record shows 3rd Bn, but appears as 2nd Bn on the CWGC site.  His wife was awarded a pension of 18/6 for herself and sons Reginald and Victor.  

TOOKEY, 22815 Pte Ferdinand Sidney, 2nd/4th Bn, Royal Berkshire Regiment.(Princess Charlotte of Wales)

Private Tookey was the son of Charles and Amy Tookey of London Road, Thundersley.  He was born and educated at Thundersley and enlisted at Whitechapel in August 1914 aged 18.  He was wounded three times in France where he was killed in action on 31st August 1918 aged 21.  He is buried at Aval Wood Military Cemetery, Vieux-Berqun, France.  His sister lived at 3, Myrtle Road, Southend-on-Sea.  His name is commemorated in St Peter's Church, Thundersley.

TUCKER, G/60331 Pte. Cecil, 17th Royal Fusiliers.

Private Tucker lived at 2, London Villas, London Road, Hadleigh. He was the son of Mrs Elizabeth Tucker (widow of George Tucker) of ‘Oakleigh’, Oak Road, Hadleigh. He was employed by Messrs. Dowsett of Leigh until his initial enlistment in the Essex Regiment (No.40330) in March 1916. He married Miss Elsie Calverley (sister of Harold Calverley who was killed 28th September 1915). He was sent to France in the following September where he was wounded in May 1917. He was killed in action at Cambrai on 28th November 1917, aged 28. His name appears on the Cambrai Memorial, Louerval, France and on the Hadleigh War Memorial (as Cecil Tocker). His brother Fred was killed in action on 27th January 1917 (see below).

TUCKER, 33797 Pte. Frederick John, 1st Border Regiment.

Born at Farnborough in Kent, Private Tucker was the son of Mrs Elizabeth Tucker of Oakleigh, Oak Road, Hadleigh and was a former bandsman at the Hadleigh Salvation Army Colony. He was married to Miss Una Katherine Potter. In 1916, he enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery (No. 178468) at Cambridge, then transferred to the Liverpool Regiment (No.5338) and finally the Border Regiment. After three weeks in France, he took part in an attack on the German positions in front of Le Transloy at 3 a.m. on the 27th January 1917. He was reported missing and subsequently was presumed to have been killed on that date, aged 32. Private Tucker is buried in the Serre Road Cemetery No. 2, France. His name appears on the Hadleigh War Memorial (as Frederick Tocker). His brother Cecil was killed in action on 28th November 1917, and his brother-in-law Harold Calverley on 28th September 1915 (see above).

TUFFS, GS/21462 Pte. Frederick Ernest, 8th Royal Fusiliers, (City of London Regt).

Private Tuffs was born in Diss, Norfolk.  The son of Alfred and Mary Ann Tuffs.  He was living in Thundersley at the outbreak and enlisted at Southend.  He was sent to France where he was killed in action on 1st July 1916 at the battle of Albert, part of the Somme offensive.  He was aged 33 and his name is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France.

UNDERWOOD, 78216 Pte. John William, 9th Royal Fusiliers.

Born at Leicester, Private Underwood was the son of John and Mary Underwood of 5, Nursery Terrace, Hadleigh, and had lived at the Hadleigh Farm Colony since he was an infant of a few months. He was employed at the Colony in the Market Gardening Department until he joined the army at Chelmsford in January 1918. He was killed in action on 28th August 1918, aged 19, after ten weeks at the front. He was buried at Casement Trench Cemetery, Montauban, and later at Peronne Road Cemetery, Maricourt, France. Private Underwood is commemorated on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

WALLACE, 75478 Pte. Charles Frederick, 29th Vancouver Battalion, Canadian Infantry (British Columbia Regiment).

Private Wallace was the son of Baldwin Fulford and Emily Elizabeth Wallace of ‘Fairlight’, Castle Lane, Hadleigh. He was born in Surrey, and his father was Commandant of the Hadleigh and Thundersley Contingent, Essex Volunteers. Charles enlisted in Canada at the outbreak of the war, and after serving in France, visited home, where he was taken ill and died on 22nd July 1916, aged 23. He was buried in Hadleigh churchyard and is commemorated on the Hadleigh War Memorial. His brother was serving as a Lieutenant with the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

WATSON, 232355 (5379) Pte. Charles Henry, 2nd London Regiment, (Royal Fusiliers).

Private Watson was born at Islington, the only son of John William and Eliza Rosina Watson of "Claremont" London Road, Hadleigh.  In 1911 he was living at Holloway and working as a tobacconists shop assistant.  He enlisted at St Pancras and was sent to France where he was killed in action on 24th March 1917 aged 21.  He is buried in Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, France.

WATSON, 40115 Pte Henry, 2nd Essex Regiment.

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Hadleigh & Thundersley WW1 Roll of Honour (Surnames N-Z)' page

Born at Benfleet, Private Watson son of John and Alice Watson lived at "Plantation Cottage" Daws Heath, Thundersley and subsequently moved to Grays, employed at the Tilbury Docks.  In 1901- 1911 he along with his brother was lodging with Alfred and Sarah Grigg in "Well Cottage" Daws Heath and working as a carman.  He enlisted at Grays in March 1916 and died of wounds in France on 31st December 1916 aged 37. He is buried at Hem Farm Military Cemetery, Hem-Monacu. He was unmarried.  His name is commemorated in St Peter's Church, Thundersley.

WATTS, G/13257 Alfred, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment), 7th Bn.

Born at Thundersley, Private Watts was the son of Mr and Mrs Frederick Watts of "Goose's Cottage", Rawreth.  He was married to Mary J. Watts and lived at 25, Seaview Road, Shoeburyness.  He enlisted at Southend in March 1916, and was reported missing on 4th August 1917, while carrying an important message on the battlefield of Ypres at Glencorse Wood, Zillebeke. He was later presumed to have been killed on that date aged 29.  he is buried at Bedford House Cemetery and is commemorated on the St Nicholas Church, Raweth and Shoeburyness War Memorials.

WEBB, 32145 Pte. Henry, 2nd Northamptonshire Regiment.

Private Webb was born at Thundersley, the son of Henry and Ada Webb of Wharf Road, Fobbing.  In 1911 he was living at Wharf Road and later enlisted at Grays.  He was sent to France where he was killed on 27th May 1918 aged 20.  His name is commemorated on the Soissons Memorial, Aisne, France.  ( The "Soldiers Died" website has him born at Thundersley, but the 1911 census shows Bowers Gifford, the family lived at Thundersley before moving to Fobbing).

WHITE, 10554 Acting Sgt. Phillip, 1st Essex Regiment.

Acting Sergeant White was the second son of Phillip and Jane White of ‘Woodlandside’, Rayleigh Road, Thundersley. He was born and educated at Hadleigh and was later employed at Harvey’s Farm, Leigh Road, Hadleigh. He enlisted in September 1914 and first served in France on 30th May 1915. Just three days before the Armistice on the 8th November 1918, he died of wounds, probably received near Chissignies on 4th November 1918, in his battalion’s last action in the war. He had previously been wounded several times. He was 30 years old and unmarried He is buried at the Caudry British Cemetery, France, and is commemorated on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

WIFFEN, 13113 Cpl. Harry John, 56th Field Coy. Royal Engineers.

Corporal Wiffen, born at Northfleet, was the eldest son of Mrs Edith Jane Ellison of the Waggon and Horses, Hadleigh. He was married to Mrs Caroline Carroll and lived at ‘Spring Cottage’, Landor Road, Shepherds Bush, London. In November 1900, Corporal Wiffen enlisted as a sapper in the Royal Engineers at Shoeburyness, but bought himself out by September 1902. He rejoined on 12th November 1903 at Chatham and spent some time stationed in Egypt. On 5th August 1914 he was promoted to corporal and on 23rd August 1914 he was killed in action at Mons, aged 37. His name is commemorated on the La Ferte-sous-Jouarre memorial, France and on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

WOODFORD, 3/940 Pte. Alfred, 1st Essex Regiment.

Born at Acton, Middlesex, Private Woodford was the son of John and Louisa Woodford and lived at The Crescent, Hadleigh. He had worked as a carter and was already serving in the army at the outbreak of war, having enlisted at Warley. He first served in France in December 1914, and was killed in action at Gallipoli on 22nd June 1915, aged 22. He is buried at Pink Farm Cemetery, Helles, Turkey, and his name appears on the Hadleigh War Memorial.

 

 

This page was added by Val Jackson on 30/05/2012.
Comments about this page (Add a comment about this page)

A fantastic piece of research. These men shouldn't be forgotten.

By Mr Miller
On 18/11/2013

Dear sirs your reference to George Piper is missing his other son my father  William Ernest Piper,your other details are correct.

By Melvin piper
On 24/08/2014

Thanks Melvin, I've added your father's details, it would be great if we could  also add a photo of your grandfather

By Val Jackson
On 24/08/2014